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Finding a job in Helsinki

Woman places sticky notes in work meeting

Helsinki is home to close to half a million jobs, or 17 per cent of the nation’s total workforce. Its industries are quite stable, with significant growth in the scientific, financial and technical sectors.

The city’s ICT businesses are booming and have overtaken trade in terms of new jobs created. In addition, Helsinki has a shortage of healthcare and early childhood education professionals, so there are many jobs available in these fields.

Increase your chances of finding a job in Helsinki

  • Ask people you know about work that might be available
  • Actively network (for example, attend job fairs, training workshops and recruitment events)
  • Contact firms you are interested in and offer to work
  • Open a Finnish bank account, as employers require this for paying your salary
  • If you are not already learning one of Finland’s two official languages, sign up to learn Finnish and/or Swedish at a location near you. Find all of the courses in Helsinki area at Finnishcourses.fi.

If you are not yet in the country and are interested in finding a job in Helsinki, go to our First Steps Checklist to see the permits and registrations that are required. The Working in Finland section of the Finnish Immigration Services website has more information.

Register as a jobseeker at the TE office

If you are already a registered resident of the city and are looking for work, your first step should be to register as a jobseeker at a regional Uusimaa Employment and Economic Development Office (known more familiarly as the TE office). The office will then direct you to Helsinki Employment Services.

Helsinki Employment Services

Helsinki Employment Services has taken over the administration of employment services for most Helsinki residents as part of a two-year pilot programme.

In addition to its other services, Helsinki Employment Services provides jobseekers from abroad with another set of targeted services that aim to help newcomers find work and settle in. People who have lived here for less than three years since their registration of residence are eligible to begin these extra services.

For example, integration training provides eligible participants with introductory Finnish or Swedish lessons and guidance in identifying and developing skills that are important for the job market. Personal employment service specialists also help participants to create their own personal vocation plan. In most cases, this integration training lasts one year.

Other options available to all eligible registered jobseekers include career coaching in easy Finnish, education advice, work try-outs and pay subsidy work, as well as apprenticeships that combine work and study. Learn more about all of the service options on the Helsinki Employment Services website.

Where can I find out if I qualify for Helsinki Employment Services?

The Helsinki Employment Services website has information on becoming a trial client. You can also call +358 9 3103 6107 from 9-15 on weekdays.

Other municipal employment services

If love has led you to Helsinki, the Spouse Program might be just what you are looking for. Arranged for recently-arrived spouses and partners from abroad, the service helps newcomers to reduce their dependency on their partner and forge their own path in their new home country. Participants expand their professional and social network, attend helpful career training, and learn more about Finland.

Another city service that offers rehabilitation, education and employment services to members of Helsinki’s international community is the Helsinki Skills Center. Customers are referred to the service by Helsinki Employment Services or social services. After a short assessment, they are then placed in, for example, a vocational workshop, a Finnish-language workshop or work coaching. The Helsinki Skills Center offers services in Somali, Arabic, English and easy Finnish.

And finally, Helsinki provides a service specifically targeted to jobseekers between the ages of 15 and 29. Ohjaamo Helsinki helps young people to find work with a low threshold. Customers can walk into a service location anytime, without an appointment, to ask about work or study opportunities, or just to talk. Ohjaamo Helsinki’s employment advisors and social workers also provide assistance on the phone, email, the Discord chat service and social media channels.

Are you interested in working for the City of Helsinki?

The City of Helsinki is the largest employer in Finland’s capital, with over 39,000 employees. Check out the city’s recruitment website for open positions of interest.

Start a business in Helsinki

If you’ve got a good business idea and adequate financing, you can easily start a business in Helsinki. Find more information on how to Start your own business in Helsinki in our Working in Helsinki section.  

Finding a job after studies

If you’ve completed a degree in Finland and want to remain in the country for work, the immigration authorities can grant you an extended residence permit to look for work or start a business. If you find yourself jobless after graduation, it is a good idea to register immediately at your closest TE office.

Where can I learn more about Helsinki’s working life?

Our Working in Helsinki section has information on salaries, taxes, working hours, workplace expectations, work permits and recognition of studies and qualifications.

What kinds of work visa or permits do I need to work in Finland?

International House Helsinki is a one-stop shop for taking care of the necessary paperwork and getting advice. IHH service advisors also offer employment consultation.